Faculty Profile: Professor Katelynn Liberatore

Profile by Sophia Avella (’20)

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Professor Katelynn Liberatore

Learning about Liberatore

Professor Liberatore is the mother of an adorable one and a half year old, loves to cook, and enjoys hiking with fellow mothers when she has some down time. She absolutely loves to read literature where she, “can enter that other world” and loves to uncover the hidden meaning behind the writings, like piecing together a puzzle.

At Pace, Professor Liberatore teaches courses such as English 110, 120, and 201. In these classes, she teaches her students how to write formal essays and critically analyze formal pieces of writing. She assigns journal style homework assignments and multiple readings from the textbook that are due each class to strengthen her students’ reading and writing skills.

Professor Liberatore was always fond of English classes. She always enjoyed reading and took a couple of AP/ honors classes in High School. But, believe it or not, going into college, she enrolled as a biology major! In fact, Liberatore did not switch her major until the end of her sophomore year in college when she realized her heart was not set on going to medical school. She simply could not see herself working in that field for the rest of her life.

“So I took a couple of English classes and ended up switching majors, then I got a Master’s degree in English, and here I am!” Liberators says with a smile.

Greatest Accomplishments

In the fall semester that Professor Liberatore changed her major, she was enrolled in a course called Eighteenth Century Novels. Liberatore says that this class is her best memory of English, although the course was the most challenging she had ever encountered. “She (her professor) was tough as nails… the class was not an easy A and I had to hold myself to a higher standard,” considering the extremely strict and “brutal” grading policy. Even so, this most certainly did not discourage Liberatore. The teacher’s harsh way of grading motivated her and she was “determined” to work diligently throughout the class. In the end, she did not ace the course. However, it really showed her how dedicated she was to declaring an English major.

Along with that fond memory, her all-time favorite class she took in college was a Narcissistic Literature Seminar. “That absolutely affected me and I ended up doing my Master’s thesis on that,” Liberatore says proudly. Her thesis was forty-seven pages long and it is obviously a prominent piece in her career. It truly was a work that she is triumphant about and it gave her a sense ,of empowerment in the major she chose. She tells current English majors to,

“stay passionate about it because, it is really easy to feel boggled down in the analysis and the really rudimentary parts of it, but always remember why you gravitated towards it.”

In the classroom:

Liberatore loves to challenge her brain when she reads works of literature: “I get a satisfaction from figuring out what I read… lately I have been reading the classics, greek mythology, Dante’s Inferno.

She also brings this aspect of solving problems and dedication to all of her classes. Liberatore states that she taught a Literature 102 class at Westchester Community College, where the students hardly showed up, were not connected, and could not care less about the due dates of assignments. “This was a real struggle to me as Professor… because they would show no enthusiasm for pieces of literature that I loved- I started to dread the class because it was like pulling teeth,” she stated, but then she went on to explain that this is why she loves teaching:

“I like all my classes for different reasons and every group of students is like a new combination.”

Liberatore enjoys figuring out and connecting with students to share her love of writing with them. “My students make the experience- not me as much,” she humbly states.

As one of her students, I must say that Professor Liberatore does in fact do everything in her power to motivate and push her students to get the best grades possible and get them involved and intrigued in what she is teaching in the classroom. She makes the class interactive and leaves it up to the students to take what they can out of this course—a truly inspiring professor.